Marketplace

Related Articles

More

Related Categories

More

Recently Added

More

Join StudyUp.com Today

It's always free and anyone can join!

Watch StudyUp Demo Video Now

International Student Travel Insurance

Tara Said:

Will I be able to live comfortably with this job?

We Answered:

I don't know how it is where you live, but it is very difficult to find a job right now. I make 32k a year and have an apartment that is $625 a month, $80 car insurance a month, $150 phone bill, and $80 electric and I make it okay. You will get paid after taxes, about 400 a week. So by making that much, do your budget, can you afford it? I would take it also b/c it's your first job and those are hard to find out of college. In a year or so, you can start applying for other positions and have some experience to make you a better candidate for a better job!

Terry Said:

Going to Amercia - What do I need?

We Answered:

Where are you going to?

Twice as much money, half as much clothing for starters

the price difference is like $15 or thereabouts? Spring for the difference

Ellen Said:

Tips on entering international finance industry for a college student?

We Answered:

Your undergrad major seems interesting. Language skills and living abroad are great selling points.

I'm not sure I understand the point of the second undergrad degree. Is this just plugging holes in your business background?

Many business schools allow you to take 1 or 2 grad level courses prior to acceptance. Certainly worth a look in your case.

None of your proposed jobs are going to impress an MBA program. Why not interview with consulting firms now? They are used to the idea of undergrads with plans for graduate school.

What about a US job for Samsung, Hyundai, etc.? Seems like a natural fit where you would learn far more about international finance than managing a rec center.

Terry Said:

I'm the student xchange from Indonesia.The fee is $7.000 to live,etc. in the US for 10months.is it xpensive?

We Answered:

for 10 months, including airfare and insurance, that's really cheap.
Since your American friends are probably travelling as backpackers, don't have the same visa restrictions in many countries as you would have, and are probably not travelling for studies but for vacation, in which case they are not legally required to have insurance, comparing what they spend with what you would spend for training is like comparing apples and oranges.

Rose Said:

Dentist Fee is same anywhere in the US?

We Answered:

Fees do vary. I'm in NY (one doctor, private office, Dutchess County) and here are the fees we'd charge:

Limited Oral Exam (no such thing as an emergency oral exam anymore) $39

2 xrays $35

Pulpal Debr (which is actually a pulpectomy $55

Root Canal (referred to endodontist) $1100

Post and core $185

Crown $886

The total amount would be $1200 in our office, minus a 10% courtesy discount since you don't have insurance, and then an additional $1100 for the endodontist to do the root canal.... soooooo it would cost you $2180.

Johnny Said:

Has anyone met a car crash with a rental car? I need some legal advice, please.....?

We Answered:

if you are an international student, talk this to the school president of the school you are entering so that the president or the public relation officer can give you advise or introduce you a lawyer to handle that case.
*car rent policy depends on the state/country. you must have asked or talked the owner of the car rental company about that before renting their car. there must be a rule/terms for the rentees/customers to abide with according to their policies.
>i assumed their cars are insured, but since as what they saw from you that you are an international student, maybe they are taking advantage that they think you don't know on country's policy so as to let you pay for the damage. for better to have a good understanding if you must or must not pay, the best thing is to talk this to the school admin as I said above, or a lawyer there, if you know one.

Luis Said:

Driving in the USA on a British driving license?

We Answered:

I'd be glad to help! First, Welcome! We look forward to your visit. I hope your travels will bring you to the sunny, sugary white beaches of northwest Florida's Emerald Coast.

Let me address the easy questions first. You generally have to be 21 to hire (or "rent," as we say over here) a car. A good source, if your starting city has one, is a rental agency called Rent-a-Wreck. They specialize in older cars (not ancient, but not brand new) and have great rates.

You will definitely have to have insurance. The minimal coverages vary by state, and you can usually buy it at the car rental agency. But do check first to be sure. It is usually in conjunction with whatever insurance coverage you have in the UK.

I have had European friends skip the bother of renting and purchase a cheap car locally, then insure it with a local insurance agent, buying just the minimal amount of coverage required. You will have to register the car in the state in which you bought it, usually at the motor vehicle bureau or the county tax collector's office. (It depends on the state. Each state has a Web site with helpful information for newcomers, including registering and insuring your car.) A good source for used cars to buy is Craigslist.com. Also check the "for sale" (also called "classifieds") section on the Web site of the local newspaper of the town where you will buy the car.

Because our gas ("petrol" to you!) is only about a quarter of the price you pay in England, it is pretty cheap to get around by car. Our passenger rail system may suck, but our highways are generally well maintained and efficiently planned! There are no restrictions traveling state to state. Whatever the prevailing law is in the state where the car is registered is recognized in the other 49 states. There are no identity, registration, insurance or passport controls between states.

But each state has a welcome station when you enter on a major highway, so be sure to stop in and pick up free state maps, travel information, hotel discount offers, etc. Some states offer free drinks, too. When you enter Florida we're pleased to give you a free glass of orange or grapefruit juice!

As for your license, I just spoke with a traffic lieutenant in our city's police department. He looked up the regulations for UK citizens visiting the U.S. You can drive with your British license without needing to get the International Driving License. You must also have your passport with you when you drive, and the car must be insured.

I wish you a pleasant visit to the U.S.!

PS: As a non-U.S. citizen you can buy a Greyhound buspass for unlimited travel around the country. A Swedish friends just did that last summer. But he reported that the buses are not particularly pleasant, nor are the people who travel on them!

Discuss It!

Paket Pulau Pari said:

performing work within the field associated with tourism is at desperate need excellent skills. working work site is very appropriate in my experience that an specialist in the field of tourism.

Travel Pulau Harapan said:

doing work in the field associated with tourism is at desperate wish excellent abilities. working work site is very appropriate in my opinion that an specialist in the field of traveling.