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Jobs In Charlotte Nc For College Students

Leah Said:

How can i get a Radio Station job?

We Answered:

Here's my brief version on how to get in radio-in the US. Take it from one who started this way. If you want to try radio as a possible career choice, It's easy, really easier than most think. Go to all the local radio stations and tell them you're willing to do anything for little or no money (at first). Including interning (though those are usually for current college students in a broadcasting major). In a big city, that's going to be more difficult than a smaller town, but not impossible.

Maybe they need a Gofer, or a production or promotion assistant. In the old days you used to be able to 'hang out" at a station. That's still a possibility (usually at night) in a small town, but in a bigger city, it's hard because the stations are in office buildings. Anyway, so maybe you get a Gofer or promotion assistant job. Or maybe you're just the kid who hangs out and will go get burgers. Then as people leave for bigger better gigs, you move up. Radio's a very fluid business. People move a lot. Because the only way to really get promoted is to go to a bigger market.

Give it a try. You've got nothing to lose. Study all the stations where you live. Visit some of the websites I'll put below. Go around to all the stations (obviously start with the ones where you like the music - but don't leave out religious stations, foreign language stations etc. anything to get experience and something legit on your resume). Because you've studied the station and listened to their format, you'll impress them with your knowledge; go to the remote broadcasts and get to know the promotion people - the ones hanging banners, in the tent and handing out bumper stickers.

Sooner or later someone will leave and you can say, "Hey, I can do that, I want his job now that he's leaving." It's important you have a driver’s license & clean record, 'cause you'll be driving the station van. Go 4 it!

Also, many colleges and some high schools (especially magnet schools) have radio courses of study and there are private vocational schools like Columbia School of Broadcasting. Emerson College in Boston is the premiere Media College in the US.

If you are interested in a career in radio, check out this great scholarship program from the John Bayliss Broadcast Foundation. It could mean $5,000 towards your tuition!
www.baylissfoundation.org

Maybe you can turn another skill, with accounting, traffic, or engineering into an off-air career. Sales, though not as popular with young people, is a great way to get into radio even if you don't have a great voice. You'll also make more money and work steadier hours - but it's not as glamorous. Radio stations also need engineers, accountants and business managers.

US Universities and colleges with radio and/or broadcast programs:

Ithaca College, NY
Monmouth Univ.
Michigan State
SF State Univ.
Southern Il Univ
Newhouse School/Syracuse Univ, NY
Grady College, Univ of GA
Univ. of Miami, FL
Univ. of Nebraska
Arizona State
Cal Poly
Central Mich. Univ.
Emerson College, Boston

Free Radio Newsletters:
www.AllAboutCountry.com
www.AllAccess.com
www.insideradio.com
www.radio-info.com

Other sites:

http://www.radioandrecords.com/rrwebsite…
www.rbr.com

- a guy named duh

Gerald Said:

Bad college choices make me feel my life is ruined, is it that bad?

We Answered:

Yeah you screwed up your life. Have fun.

Pauline Said:

Am I heading in the right direction?

We Answered:

If that is what you really want to do, and you seem to be happy with your choice, then I'd say - go for it. (I'm female and became a chemist, and got my MBA - at a time when 90% of chemists were male, so I can appreciate your dedication and I also heard a lot of negativity.)

However, realize that most companies only employ one or maybe two HR people, so your job opportunties may be limited. But, many companies hire mostly women in HR positions. (They used to hire women because a lot of companies got into trouble because they didn't have any women in management - and the easiest position to put a woman in management (in many company's opinions), was in charge of HR. And there, the woman would hit the "glass ceiling," where she couldn't be promoted any higher, yet she would show up as being in management on their books. Many HR departments are still staffed mostly by women, as a result.) If you do get into HR, you can have a good career and earn good money, but don't expect to be promoted out of it - there are exceptions, but it usually doesn't happen. Once in HR, people tend to stay there (again, although there are exceptions).

Psychology and business are good majors for this. You may also want to branch out and take courses if business law, if they are offered. The more you know about corporate and employee laws, unions, etc., the better. Also, know computers fairly well. All records are computerized, and usually in databases.

And, be prepared - it may be difficult to find a job locally, since there may not be all that many companies where you live. You may have to move to another area.

Internships are good. I'd also suggest trying to work as a temp, if you have time during the summer recess. Sign up with a temp agency, like Kelly Services, or Ajilon, and try to get into a larger company - one that will have an HR department. (You can tell the temp agency you are only looking for work in a larger company - you don't have to tell them why, just that you'd prefer to work there.) Sooner or later, temps always end up talking to the HR department, and then maybe you could make some connections and see if they could help you in your goal. Meanwhile, you'd be earning some money. (And I once got assigned to a temp job in an HR department while I was working at that company as a temp.)

If you really want it to work, and you really try, I think you may have a chance at it. Just remember that there aren't many positions available. I'd suggest you also come up with a backup plan in case you can't get into a HR department right away.

Darren Said:

Am I making a mistake leaving one college after 2 years, then trying next year for a better school?

We Answered:

Your associates from J&W is not useless. You can use it to transfer to a strong university, and your GPA is good. But you must apply to more than just NC State.

I do not think you're making a mistake by retaking calculus, and by taking any other classes required by NC State for transfer students. I do not think you're making a mistake by finishing your associates at J&W, and then transferring to a different, stronger college to get your bachelors. In fact, once you have your bachelors, no one will care where you got your associates (you can even leave it off your resume if you want to.)

However, you must apply to more colleges than just NC State. You must have some backups that you like. I want you to go to a good school in a year, but there is no guarantee that it'll be NC State. Have some backups.

NC State is an extremely competitive college to get into. They let in less than half of the transfer applicants who apply. The average GPA of its admitted students is higher than your current GPA. I believe that you should apply, no question, but you must have some back up schools.

When you do apply to schools, I recommend you follow this pattern:
- NC State and, if you want, one other somewhat reach school
- A couple schools that fit your GPA quite well
- A couple schools where your GPA makes you pretty darn sure you'd get in
- One super back up school, which you really, really think you'll get into.

And make *all* those schools be academically respectable colleges that fit that "real college" criteria you've set.


An aside: when you retake calculus, ask for tutoring immediately. Do not wait until you're having trouble - you already know you've failed this course once. Ask for tutoring in the first week or so. The cc will have a tutoring center, or ask your academic advisor to help hook you up with a tutor.

Clifford Said:

Jobs for Psychology majors with business minor? HR/Marketing?

We Answered:

You might also consider getting a Ph.D. in something called industrial/organizational psychology. They make allot of money and they work as psychologists in the corporate world doing human resource management.

You can easily start to earn $30,000 as either a marketing assistant or an HR assistant as long as you have a bachelor's degree. Marketing strategists and marketing product managers often make even more money than advertising and PR people, and with less stress on the job.

Shannon Said:

Am I on the right track for college?

We Answered:

Looks pretty good!! If you are concerned about your SAT scores, take it again. Did you realize that if you have 15 or more college credits (dual credits count, of course), that you'll be considered a transfer student and your SAT scores aren't weighted that much (if at all)?

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